What else can parents do?


When it comes to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, parents and caregivers should be careful not to jump to conclusions. A high energy level alone does not mean that he or she has attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The diagnosis depends on whether the child can focus well enough to complete tasks that suit his or her age and intelligence. This ability is most likely to be noticed by a teacher. Input from teachers should be taken seriously since some children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder have many different types of needs and often require special accommodations to help them function.


If You Expect Your Child Has ADHD


Make an appointment with a psychiatrist, psychologist, child neurologist, or behavioral pediatrician for an evaluation. (Ask the child's doctor for a referral.)


Be patient if the young person is diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and recognize that progress takes time.


Instill a sense of competence in the child or adolescent. Promote his or her strengths, talents, and feelings of self-worth.


Remember that, in many instances, failure, frustration, discouragement, low self-esteem, and depression cause more problems than the disorder itself.


Remember that, in many instances, failure, frustration, discouragement, low self-esteem, and depression cause more problems than the disorder itself.


Get accurate information from libraries, hotlines, or other sources.


Ask questions about treatments and services.


Talk with other families in their communities.


People who are not satisfied with the mental health care they are receiving should discuss their concerns with the provider, ask for information, and/or seek help from other sources. It may take time for families and providers to find the right "mix" of services and supports that work best for a child. While treatment may not fully eliminate unwanted symptoms, most children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder respond to medication and behavioral therapy. Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may qualify for free services within public schools. Most children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or other disabilities are eligible to receive special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This act guarantees appropriate services and a public education to children ages 3 to 21 with disabilities.


Finding the right school or program can sometimes be challenging. We have several options that are very helpful for youth that are unable to make it in a regular classroom setting. If you would like more information about the help we can provide please feel free to give us a call. We will ask you some questions about your child and try to give you some possible placement options.